control theory books


… fighting your way through this book will not, in itself, make you an expert in process control.” Luyben, “Process Modeling…”, p. 7.

The following books have been added to the bibliography; the entry for carstens has been edited to reflect my now-formal categories.

Carstens, for example, described PID, but used a rate generator to shift his bode plot sideways; the schaum’s outline, by contrast, barely mentions PID, and designs lead-lag controllers instead.

I think I am going to work thru Ellis next, for his treatment of observers, namely the luenberger observer, in a classical setting.

On odd days of the month, Tewari is the book I think I want to work thru for state space properly. On even days of the month, I think I want to start with the state space chapter in Franklin et al. Then, in either case, I’ve got to curl up with Kailath’s linear systems: there’s the mathematics of state-space.

If I’m trying to look at process control, I generally pick up all three of Bequette, Stephanopoulos, and Luyben.

For continuous EE control theory, I had been working thru Franklin et al., a fine general-purpose undergraduate text. They have a second text for digital control.

Bequette, B. Wayne; Process Control: Modeling, Design, and Simulation.
Prentice Hall, 2003. ISBN 0 13 353640 8.
[controls: classical & modern, ChE, continuous; 9 mar 2008]
This is a wonderful overview. Don’t misunderstand: this is a typical “you can’t cover all this in one semester” text, but he mentions a whole lot of things, and I want more on just about everything he does… good intro to IMC (internal model control). 
This is a first course in process control. Matlab.

Carstens, James R.; Automatic Control Systems and Components.
Prentice Hall, 1990. ISBN 0 13 054297 0
[controls: classical EE continuous; 9 mar 2008]
This book caught my eye when I saw that he had transfer functions for specific devices used in control systems; it won my heart when he distinguished between the parameters in his math models and the parameters to be found in catalogs!
This is an introductory and hands-on book. 

DiStefano, Joseph J., Stubberud, Allen R., Williams, Ivan J.; Schaum’s Outlines: Feedback and Control Systems.
McGraw-Hill, 1990 (2nd ed.). ISBN 0 07 017052 5.
[controls: mostly classical, EE, continuous & discrete; 9 mar 2008]
8 of its chapters are analysis / design using nyquist / root-locus / nichols / bode. This is where I find out what mathematica can do, and what it struggles with: “just the facts, ma’am.”
This is a first course in process control; no significant computer software.

Ellis, George; Control System Design Guide.
Elsevier, 2004, 3rd ed. ISBN 0 12 237461 4.
[controls: classical, EE, mostly continuous; 9 mar 2008]
From an introduction, to motion and position control. I call it EE but he uses primarily PID. He was recommended for his treatment of “observers” in an otherwise classical EE treatment of control systems.
This is a second course in controls; proprietary software, only for PCs.

Franklin, Gene F., Powell, J. David, Emami-Naeni, Abbas; Feedback Control of Dynamic Systems.
Pearson Prentice Hall, 2006 (5th ed). ISBN 0 13 149930 0
[controls: mostly classical, EE, mostly continuous; 9 mar 2008]
This is a well-respected senior year text, and I enjoy it. It has one long state space chapter.
This is a first course. Matlab.

Kailath, Thomas; Linear Systems.
Prentice Hall, 1980. ISBN 0 13 536961 4
[linear algebra; controls: modern, EE, continuous & discrete; 9 mar 2008]
For my experience, there isn’t a lot of linear algebra here, but what there is being used thoroughly. I think it’s a great look at modern applied linear algebra, which is what it was recommended to me as.
Not a first book on the subject (neither linear algebra nor state space).

Luyben, William L.; Process Modeling, Simulation, and Control for Chemical Engineers.
McGraw-Hill, 1990 (2nd ed.). ISBN 0 07 039159 9.
[controls: classical, ChE, mostly continuous; 9 mar 2008]
I like luyben’s style. In content, I can’t see a whole lot of difference between this and Stephanopoulos; except this is a little more modern.
Multiple chapters about multivariate and about digital.
This is a first course in process control; uses Fortran rather than Matlab.

Stephanopoulos, George; Chemical Process Control.
Prentice Hall 1984. ISBN 0 13 128629 3.
[controls, classical ChE, mostly continuous; 9 mar 2008]
I think this is the classic text. It’s well written and has lots of examples and problems. One of the two books I reach for practical process control; Bequette seems a little more academic.
This is a first course in process control; no significant computer software.

Schaum’s Outlines: Feedback and Control Systems; DiStefano, Joseph J., Stubberud, Allen R., Williams, Ivan J.
McGraw-Hill, 1990 (2nd ed.). ISBN 0 07 017052 5.
[controls: mostly classical, EE, continuous & discrete; 9 mar 2008]
8 of its chapters are analysis / design using nyquist / root-locus / nichols / bode. This is where I find out what mathematica can do, and what it struggles with: “just the facts, ma’am.”
This is a first course in process control; no significant computer software.

Tewari, Ashish; Modern Control Design with Matlab & Simulink.
Wiley, 2002. ISBN 0 471 49679 0.
[controls: modern, EE, mostly continuous; 9 mar 2008]
“This book aims at introducing the reader to the basic concepts… while covering in detail what may normally be considered advanced topics, such as multivariable state-space design… optimal control, Kalman filters, robust control, and digital control.”
ch 2 is a summary of classical control theory. 
A first course in state space. Matlab.

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One Response to “control theory books”

  1. Gabe Says:

    I’ve started a wiki on Control Theory. The site has detailed examples of control system design and analysis.

    http://wikis.controltheorypro.com/index.php?title=Category:Examples

    Please stop by


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